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Archive for the ‘Japan TV/OVA’ Category

Vision of Escaflowne - Anime TV Series Analysis - Fate and Luck

Thursday, May 21st, 1998

The Divining Pendant

(Major Spoilers Ahead!)

It is a wonder that I am still alive.

Throughout most of my childhood and adolescence a divining pendant determined my health. Whenever I would come down with something as simple as a cold or as complicated and mysterious as a thyroid infection every Valentine’s Day, my mother would solicit the help of her New Age guru Don. Based upon my birth date, name and a physical possession of mine he would psychically prescribe exact daily dosages of vitamins and herbal remedies. A divining pendant (a New Age crystal on the end of a chain) that I assume would point to the right drugs for the cure amplified his psychic ability. If you are detecting a hint of skepticism you would not be far off. However, the fact remains that I was never sick long and I have a relatively clean bill of health considering that I can count on my hands how many times I have made an office visit to a conventional doctor in my 26 years. Am I lucky or is there some method to the madness of the divining pendant prescriptions? What is luck? How is this fate determined? Is it controllable?

Continue reading Vision of Escaflowne - Anime TV Series Analysis - Fate and Luck

Popularity: 92% [?]

Vision of Escaflowne - Anime TV Series Analysis - Gender Roles

Thursday, May 21st, 1998

Knights Scream, Princesses Cry

(Major Spoilers Ahead!)

Anime, with all its progressive ventures into the future of humanity, cannot get past the stereotypical gender roles required to add up to a romantic adventure’s sum. The audience must feel the pain and yearning that the lead female romantic interest feels as she waits and prays for her man who is off in the war. The man of war or knight expects his woman or princess to be home praying for his safe return. The princess is expected to breakdown under the overwhelming will of the knight. She can only provide support through prudent advice and the warm memories she has left her knight to think of in his darkest times. The woman must maintain a good and virtuous face for the common people so as not to alarm them to the knight’s hardships. It is an accepted notion that the knight will feel angry and get caught up in the overblown tempers of war screaming his way to victory while the princess will tend to domestic issues and go to bed crying every night when she receives bad news from the front lines.

At least that is what conventional epic romances strive for.

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Popularity: 16% [?]

Neon Genesis Evangelion - Anime TV Series Analysis - Science’s Children

Thursday, January 15th, 1998

The current debate over human cloning and genetic engineering is tame when compared to the Frankenstein-esque scenarios so common in speculative fiction. With today’s technology, human cloning is just another device for conceiving a child. It has nothing to do with mass-producing slaves for labor on off world colonies or pilots for an army of giant robots.

So what’s the big deal? People’s fear of this new technology could stem from the megalomaniac attitudes of the scientists supporting it. Richard G. Seede, the Chicago researcher that would enjoy cloning humans for barren couples in the next three months, made a statement that epitomizes the cautionary morals of Neon Genesis Evangelion and Blade Runner, “Human cloning brings us one step closer to God.” One step too close, many would argue. This extra step causes the creator to invent monsters that that can only turn on their masters.

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Popularity: 10% [?]